If I Ran RIM

If I Ran RIM: I'd FOCUS!

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BlackBerry Focus

[ If I Ran RIM is an editorial series by CrackBerry's Founder and Editor In Chief, Kevin Michaluk. It looks at the things he would be doing if he were on the senior management team or board of directors at Research In Motion ] 

With the troops rallied and ready for battle, it's time for Research In Motion to buckle down and "git-r-done." But more important than working hard is working smart. It's not just a matter of RIM getting things done, but getting the *right* things done. As RIM works through their tech transition from the BlackBerry OS to BBX platform, RIM needs to FOCUS. Even though RIM is a big company with thousands of employees and therefore has the resources to tackle a lot of product initiatives, I think most people reading this will agree that right now it's more important for RIM to do a few GREAT things than it is to do several GOOD (or sub par) things. Sometimes less is more. RIM's best people need to be focused on delivering RIM's next great product, and anything that distracts from that needs to be cut out.

If I Ran RIM: I'd Rally the Troops!

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If I Ran RIM

[ If I Ran RIM is a new editorial series by CrackBerry's Founder and Editor In Chief, Kevin Michaluk. It looks at the things he would be doing if he were on the senior management team or board of directors at Research In Motion ]

Companies have feelings. Well, that's not quite true. People have feelings. But companies would not exist without people. And on a week when Research In Motion's share value is trading at a 7 year low, my hunch is that a lot of RIM employees are feeling pretty down in the dumps. 

If you read BlackBerry: The Inside Story of Research In Motion, there's a good story in the book that tells of how RIM's Co-CEO Jim Balsillie effectively banned employees talking about RIMM share price at work. If you got caught breaking that rule, you had to buy donuts the next day for EVERYBODY (an expensive fine, especially as the company grew to have thousands of employees!). Jim's take was that going public was just a way for the company to raise money to execute its vision - worrying about the day to day value shouldn't distract from the company's longer term goals and mission.