How often do you make notes throughout the day? Quite a bit, I would imagine. There’s always something that catches our eyes, even for a second or two. Those that are note-worthy, must be written down before you forget. I know I would. Can you count how many times you said “Where did we find those…” or “What was the name of that place again?” My BlackBerry's note pad has dozens upon dozens of notes that I’ve quickly typed out. I would typically capture the name and basic details, sometimes leaving out location and such. This isn’t a big deal for places you’re familiar with, but what about that small exotic restaurant or boutique you happened to stumble across? Sometimes you drive by a sign that grabs your attention. Even though you try to remember to check it out, you forget where it was…or what it was.

By jogging your memory, DulyNoted will be a string on your finger. Well, a string as in an application…and finger as in your BlackBerry. With DulyNoted, you can create notes that are geotagged. Now you can see where you were when an important note/reminder was made. Travel back there with certainty! Let’s have a closer gander at DulyNoted.

About DulyNoted

I know I wasn’t the only CrackBerry user or abuser who received a PIN over the weekend regarding DulyNoted, which is currently in version 1.4. I must say that it was a creative way to generate interest. Too bad it was for my Pearl I had a couple of years ago! Good thing I still had it. Behind this application, (and probably the mass of PIN messages) is a company called ScreamingToaster. I’ve never heard a toaster scream, but if I did, I would make sure the event was duly noted. See what I just did there? DulyNoted is available for BlackBerry smartphones running OS 4.6 or higher, and will take up 548 KB. On DulyNoted style, I’m going to begin as the application begins:

“Starting Reactor Core…Initiating Launch Sequence…Activating Awesomeness”

DulyNoted is definitely a new twist on notes. It’s as I said before; you take care of the what, the application takes care of the where. The application uses both cell tower information and assisted GPS to get a fix on your location. Let’s have a look at the menu. The top portion of the main menu houses the command, sorting and search options. The bottom contains the list of notes that you have made. You can potentially create an unlimited number of notes. If you’re that forgetful, you may need more than an application to get the hope you need.

creating a new note

Note taking is quite simple. A click to the Create New Note button generates a pop up. In this pop up, you can record the name of the note, any keywords and choose colour coding for easy retrieval. Once you save, DulyNoted will add in location details. You can then reopen the note and enter any additional information, which you may require, in the blank field. When viewing the list of notes, each entry will display the name of the note, the day and time the note was created, the keyword, the colour chosen and the distance you are from each geotagged note. The application will only use imperial measurement, not metric. The most accurate value I’ve seen on a note is within 30 feet. All of your notes can be viewed in various ways:

Distance from me – you can choose to view geotagged note from the closest to your position to the farthest, or vice versa.

Timestamp – view the newest notes first, or the oldest first.

Name – notes are listed in alphabetical or reverse alphabetical order.

Color – all the colours you have used are grouped together. Use the colours to indicate business or personal notes - it’s up to you.

Keywords – Notes are sorted by keywords. Like the Name view, they can be viewed in alphabetical or reverse alphabetical order.

Type – this option isn’t fully explored yet. When creating a note, the only type of note available is a short note.

the main menu

To easily switch between the normal and reverse views, you have to click on the gear icon. You can change the sort ordering from Closest/Newest/Normal to Farthest/Oldest/Inverse. As you travel around this world, your geotagged notes are shuffled around to show real time proximity of the locations you recorded.

The notes you create are not actually stored on your BlackBerry. Your notes and settings are stored in “the cloud”; a container that is part of ScreamingToaster’s “the ONE platform.” This is both a good and a bad thing. The good part is this storage method frees up precious memory. If you had to reinstall your OS, you can easily retrieve all of your information. The bad thing is that if you were in an area of poor or no coverage, you wouldn’t have access to your notes. There is a workaround for this. DulyNoted included an option that allows you to share notes with others. You can simply send a PIN message or email to yourself prior to entering a “data dead zone.”

Managing your Profile

Feeling Twitterpated? DulyNoted lets you tweet your status and captured photo directly from the application. The status and photo will consist of separate tweets. Perhaps in future builds, you can send off co-ordinates as well. There’s one last thing that I should mention; mapping. You can request to see a map of the location via Google maps. They could do so much more with this function. There’s no zoom option, nor can you request directions; it’s just there for show. If you’re really bored, you can view other DulyNoted users near you. The application allows you to view their location and even PIN them.

Access the map...
...but now what?


DulyNoted Pro was definitely worth a look at. I could see the possibilities with this app. It’s like taking a virtual trip down memory lane. The map and Twitter features were a good idea, but can definitely be expanded upon. The capturing and retrieving of notes was fairly quick and painless. DulyNoted is $10 annually, but has a 2 day free trial, so you can try before you buy. You can check out DulyNoted Pro at screamingtoaster.com


  • create geotagged notes
  • send tweets from within the application
  • notes shuffled based on your location


  • Twitter functions could be expanded
  • mapping lacks functionality

More Info