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BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 and BlackBerry Device Service gain FIPS 140-2 certification

BlackBerry PlayBook
By Bla1ze on 27 Jul 2012 02:55 pm EDT
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Keeping in line with their security focused background, RIM has now announced that both the BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 and BlackBerry Device Service have now gained FIPS 140-2 certification. The BlackBerry PlayBook having been the first FIPS certified tablet for deployment within U.S. federal government agencies and Australian government has maintained certification with each iteration of the OS and kernel and presumably, will continue to meet the gold standard IT and security organizations.

In addition to those items being certified, BlackBerry 7 devices are also FIPS 140-2 certified by the National Institute of Standards and technology (NIST) and the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC). In simpler words, BlackBerry remains secure and goverments will continue to use the devices and services no matter how many useless drivel articles pop up stating otherwise.

Source: BizBlog

Reader comments

BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 and BlackBerry Device Service gain FIPS 140-2 certification

38 Comments

"In simpler words, BlackBerry remains secure and goverments will continue to use the devices and services no matter how many useless drivel articles pop up stating otherwise."

Well said.

I'll always appreciate a well secured device, whether it has all the bells and whistles or not.

Good for RIM for keeping security a high priority.

Too bad they can't get certified in skype or any other useful apps the majority of people actually care about...

If Skype is the most useful app you use on your device, please: Stay with that device. I like to be entertained as much as the next person, but Skype will not be the deciding factor in me making a purchase of a mobile phone. I have better things to do with my time.

As much as it is great that BBs have the best security. The majority of consumers could care less. They should still keep secuirty a priority but should focus on marketing how fun and practical and enjoyable the phone is to the user. Samsung and apple do this the best. RIMS be bold campaign is boring and repeditive. Look I can email and make phone calls and plan my life on a secure phone for my business. Guess what consumers dont care, boring. RIM please start focusing on everyday practicality and not pushing enterprise orianted features. If you want to continue to proceed in this manner just focus on business and get out of consumer market as its not helping you one bit.

I think the US government is a customer worth keeping and catering to their needs. They have a half million BBs, a server for each dept within the govt. RIM isn't going out of business until the US govt tells them they can (See: Matter of National Security)

The govt isnt fickle when it comes to what they are looking for.... not swayed by the flavour (Cdn) of the day (koolaid of course... lol) mentality that consumers are I-proving on a regular basis.

Well RIMs target market was initially governments and businesses who wanted top secure devices. As mentioned many times before, they somehow fell into the consumer market and are doing one heck of a job trying to cater to both markets. Kudos fo RIM. I hope they can pull it off.

I agree with the both of you. However, they have to start focusing their marketing on consumers. Everyone, knows the top gov agancies will stick with Rim. All i am saying if they want to grow and get back what they lost. They will have to show consumers they ars a cool and hip brand that allows you to do day to day practical things the competition and not Rim is known for. If they continue to only market to enterprise as they are, no way in hell are they going to claw back. I am all for them keeping current customers happy, but they have to bring new customers in the fold. Something they not doing. They are bleeding more customers then gaining, not a good sign.

Sir. If this is what you call "finally some good news", please stay more informed with CB, N4BB, and other BB/RIM fan sites.

As soon as NFC picks up and people start storing more financially relevant personal infornation on their phones, they will become woefully aware how much more important security is than skype.

This is why I will always use blackberry. I couldn't care less if I have half a billion apps to use. I have the essentials and I'm good to go. IMO security will be a critical intergration of mobility in the future as users become more and more dependent on their devices in the long run. This is only the beginning of the ' mobile movement '. I think Rim is correct to stay this course. Rim is here to stay people.

Peace

If you guys don't think security is important just ask Apple who is losing $$$ over their latest blunder with the app store. What is even scarier is that the guy that discovered the problem couldn't believe that Apple ID passwords were transmitted in plain text and not encrypted. Just wait for further security problems to become exposed! It really looks good on them.

It would be more accurate to say YOU want Skype. As a defense attorney I can tell you that I want security and protection for my privacy.

For now you are excused to leave your trolling activities elsewhere. However feel free to contact my office after your privacy has been violated. Maybe then you will think more highly of your security.

Bingo. Thats the problem, Rim like this attorney think security is a staple and they over market that. Guess what the general consumer couldnt give a rats ass as proven in Rims current consumer market share. Rim and theor supporters can scream protection from the cyber boogyman all they want. The fact is security doesnt sell anymore in everyday joe public mobile use. Thet want a great eco system with fun flashy features which Rim has zero of. Like my previous post, Rim has to focus on consumer marketing. They are not going to loose their core enterprise cliant so why waste market doller on them, they are a sure thing.

Glad to be using the most secure platform. GO RIM!!

...that sound I hear is a tornado ready to blow the trolls and naysayers away!! Lol

I'm pleased and rather proud to own the only tablet and and a handset too, which passes the high standards of security required by several governments aound the world. Note, for those who work for such governments, there is no BYOD for work purposes. It's the Berry way or the highway. That should be instructive to consumers and enterprise [and I might add that it should also be of interest to spies, terrorists and the like!;].
So long as security remains a concern for a segment of smartphone users, RIM has a future of some sort. Can't say fairer than that.

Everybody cares about security. Not just the majority. And security only comes into play for anyone when they have a breach. Consumers don't care because they haven't been breach yet. If and when they do then it will be a whole different scenario. That is why I fear for iPhone and Samsung owners. The more they grow the more enticing it will be for hackers to go after them. I'm amaze it hasn't yet. But it will and BB will be the one ahead as usual.

It wont change a thing, people hear about celeberties and high end figuers phones being hacked for pics and the like all the time. Yet RIM is loosing customers every day. WINDOWS PCs are a hackers dream yet they dominate the computer world. Security wont save RIM, establishing an eco system that rivals ios and android for the consumer will. Also i dont know about ios but android has ant virus and security apps that sell in droves and are really decent. Also eventually android and ios will have secuirity that will match RIMs as they both want to enter the enterprise market. What then for Rim. I am not trying to troll here, as a former BB lover and user still wanting them to thrive. They need to look beyond security and enterprise if they want to servive. I am not saying to abondon there core values but expand into new things the consumer will love and be interested in, something they not doing and its really showing with their current state.

Bla1ze,

I think it is imperative that RIM maintain their security advantage through the FIPS accreditation. Unfortunaly, I think we will see the competition also receiving FIPS 140-2 certification if they haven't already. As for the U.S. Federal Gov't, we are already seeing organizations switching to Apple devices. My office in particular has deployed a number of iPads and iPhones. In my Agency alone, we have hundreds. That beings said, we are still evaluating these devices, but so far they are certainly considered more desirable than a Blackberry. Unfortunately, we haven't done a hardware 'refresh' since the Bold 9000. So, when people consider the option between what they have now and an iPhone or a iPad, they will jump for an Apple device.

I've asked RIM to come demo the Bold 9900 and Playbook capabilities against their competition. However, RIM has quietly let Apple walk right in and take their business. I also blame AT&T and Verizon who have made pricing plans that appear to give Apple a price advantage. So, the 'bean counters' now argue that for the price Apple is the choice.

David

On the face of it I don't see how beancounters can say a $600 iPad is cheaper than a $250 Playbook (32Gb pricing from FutureShop.ca). BB devices has continually been certified by U.S. government regulators whereas other brands have generally not been. Maybe there's something I'm missing?

BruvvaPete,

The bean counters contend that when the phones are compared the iPhone is cheaper. The Agency has never really considered the Playbook as it doesn't have broadband capability. I have on many occasions suggested that the Playbook could actually save the govt money over the iPad by using the Blackberry Bridge. However, the Agency wants to be able to deploy a tablet without having to have both phone and tablet.

David

Strange since BB's consume far less data than any other platform. I will say though that RIM should have a rep in every city with a decent sized population to push their product. I'm sure that if RIM had pitched to your management things might have gone differently in your case.

Look at Linux/Red Hat. All free and has the same capabilities and functions of MS. This open source has less vulnerabilities and is more stable than any other OS. It would save governments billions. Problem: no rep pushes it to a point.

Bottom line is you and I can suggest all we want. We normally have no voice.